MILLIONS OF

 LIVES ARE ON THE LINE

 IF WE DON'T TAKE

ACTION TOGETHER!

 

 

Donations go to the purchase of emergency protective kit to be supplied to households in Liberia. Caregivers (family members) and health workers are most at risk of contracting the disease. This kit will reduce their risk and potentially save lives. 

 

 

 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT EBOLA

Over 4,555 Total Deaths in West Africa

LIBERIA: Over 2,484 deaths... 

SIERRA LEONE: 1200

GUINEA: 862

NIGERIA: 8

SENEGAL: 1

UNITED STATES: 1

SOURCE: CDC AS OF OCTOBER 17, 2014

 

Without additional interventoins or changes in community behavior, CDC estimates that by January 20, 2015, there will be a total of approx 550,000 Ebola cases in Liberia and Sierra Leone or 1.4 million if corrections for underreporting are made. (CDC)

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Fever

  • Severe headache

  • Muscle Pain

  • Weakness

  • Diarrhea

  • Vomiting

  • Abdominal (Stomach) pain

 

*Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

 

Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, but the average is 8 to 10 days.

Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive clinical care and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years.

 

 

 

 

 

If you travel to or are in an area affected by an Ebola outbreak, make sure to do the following:

 

  • Practice careful hygiene. For example, wash your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and avoid contact with blood and body fluids.

 

  • Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids (such as clothes, bedding, needles, and medical equipment).

 

  • Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.

 

  • Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these animals.

  • Avoid hospitals in West Africa where Ebola patients are being treated. The U.S. embassy or consulate is often able to provide advice on facilities.

 

  • After you return, monitor your health for 21 days and seek medical care immediately if you developsymptoms of Ebola.

 

 

 

Healthcare workers who may be exposed to

people with Ebola should follow these steps:

 

 

 

  • Wear protective clothing, including masks, gloves, ​​gowns, and eye protection.

 

  • Practice proper infection control and sterilization measures. For more information, see “Infection Control for Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers in the African Health Care Setting”.

  • Isolate patients with Ebola from other patients.

 

  • Avoid direct contact with the bodies of people who have died from Ebola.

 

  • Notify health officials if you have had direct contact with the blood or body fluids, such as but not limited to, feces, saliva, urine, vomit, and semen of a person who is sick with Ebola. The virus can enter the body through broken skin or unprotected mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth.

 

Many thanks to Channel Africa for their support for this campaign in Sub-Saharan Africa. Please review the information at www.channelafrica.co.za

SYMPTONS 
PREVENTIVE MEASURES

Babson African Student Organization (BASO)

Babson College

231, Forest Street, Babson Park

Massachusetts, 02457

Contact #: +1-646-225-8836

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